Use of molecular biology techniques to optimise production of value-added products from non-animal food wastes

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Resource or Project Abstract

The main objective of the work-programme was to identify the type of fermentative bacteria involved in the breakdown of carbohydrates. The major fermentative species present in granules, which were fed on simple sugars at both mesophilic (37C) and themophilic (55C) temperatures were identified. The fermentative species identified were of both bacterial and yeast origin. The bacterial clone library produced from the seed sludge consisted of Gammaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16.2%) and Clostridia (14.8%). The fermentative bacterial species identified in the clone library obtained from granules in the mesophilic reactor were Bacteroides sp. (31%), Spirochaetes (25%), Clostridia (16%), the fermentative species which were identified in the thermophillic reactor were Clostridia (78%) and Nitrospira (10%). Clostridium species were the only genus of organisms that were present in all three granule types. The incubation temperature had a significant influence on the type of fermentative bacteria present in granules fed on simple sugars as different consortia of bacteria had developed at different temperatures. The presence of yeast was also investigated, and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica was identified in the mesophilic granules, but not in the thermophilic granules. Therefore, the temperature also had a significant influence on the presence or absence of the fermentative yeast. Having identified some of the main groups of organisms that ferment sugars, the fermentative bacteria, which are important in degrading proteins were also investigated. The fermentative species present in granules, which were fed on fish blood waste at ambient temperature at two different rates or hydraulic retention times (HRT), 2-day HRT(A2) and 4-day HRT (A4) were identified. Initial screening of the fermentative bacteria from sample A4 indicated that it was comprised of Pseudomonas sp. (27.36%), Bacteroides sp. (9.8%), Synthrophobacter sulfatireducens (7.8%), and Alcaligenes sp. (7.8%).

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Contact Information for This Resource

Dr. Fidelma Hernon
National University of Ireland Galway
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Microbiology, School of Natural Sciences, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland
Telephone: 353 (0)91 492294
e-mail: microbiology@nuigalway.ie

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Attachment Name and Download Link
End of Project Report    ERTDI_Hernon_Molecular_epr.pdf  (1.05 Mb)
Att 2    Figures-from-Hernon-Report.pdf   (0.94 Mb)

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Author(s)Hernon, F.
Title Of WebsiteSecure Archive For Environmental Research Data
Publication InformationUse of molecular biology techniques to optimise production of value-added products from non-animal food wastes
Name of OrganisationEnvironmental Protection Agency Ireland
Electronic Address or URL http://erc.epa.ie/safer/resource?id=f41bd8bc-ce44-102c-9c91-0a68ec663af0
Unique Identifierf41bd8bc-ce44-102c-9c91-0a68ec663af0
Date of AccessLast Updated on SAFER: 2017-06-29

An example of this citation in proper usage:

Hernon, F.   "Use of molecular biology techniques to optimise production of value-added products from non-animal food wastes". Associated datasets and digitial information objects connected to this resource are available at: Secure Archive For Environmental Research Data (SAFER) managed by Environmental Protection Agency Ireland http://erc.epa.ie/safer/resource?id=f41bd8bc-ce44-102c-9c91-0a68ec663af0 (Last Accessed: 2017-06-29)

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Access Information For This Resource

SAFER-Data Display URL http://erc.epa.ie/safer/iso19115/display?isoID=119
Resource Keywordsmunicipal waste carbohydrate-rich fermentative bacteria yeast
EPA/ERTDI/STRIVE Project Code2003-CD-LS-FS-01
EPA/ERTDI/STRIVE Project ThemeWaste and Resource Management
Resource Availability: Any User Can Download Files From This Resource
Public-Open
Limitations on the use of this ResourceIn instances where this report is cited or used in other presentation forms or reports a full citation should be provided. SAFER automatically provides a citation which is available for use in such situations. **** PLEASE NOTE *** Queries reqarding this project should be directed to Martha Shaughnessy, Administrative Officer,Research Office,Information Technology Building,
National University of Ireland, Galway,T: 353 (0)91 493124
Number of Attached Files (Publicly and Openly Available for Download): 2
Project Start Date Wednesday 1st January 2003 (01-01-2003)
Earliest Recorded Date within any attached datasets or digital objects Wednesday 1st January 2003 (01-01-2003)
Most Recent Recorded Date within any attached datasets or digital objects Monday 20th July 2009 (20-07-2009)
Published on SAFERThursday 30th July 2009 (30-07-2009)
Date of Last EditThursday 30th July 2009 at 13:28:27 (30-07-2009)
Datasets or Files Updated On Thursday 30th July 2009 at 11:50:46 (30-07-2009)

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Geographical and Spatial Information Related To This Resource

Description of Geographical Characteristics of This Project or Dataset
This was a laboratory-based project.

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Supplementary Information About This Resource

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Lineage information about this project or dataset
Municipal waste deposited in landfill sites in Ireland still consists of large quantities of biodegradable waste. One significant component of biodegradable waste is food waste in the form of non-animal waste fruit and vegetables, not only from households, but also from commercial outlets, restaurants and supermarkets which also dispose of 'out of date' stock. Much of this carbohydrate-rich waste may be biodegraded using suitably developed anaerobic digestion processes. The carbohydrate-rich fractions may be converted to soluble sugars by the bacteria of the outer layer of granular sludge. The soluble sugars may then be used for the production of the high value product, methane, by bacteria of the inner layers of the granular sludge. There has been extensive research done on the archaeal species of the anaerobic digestion process and in particular, on the methanogens. However, little is known about fermentative species and their adaptability to the influent feed.
Supplementary Information
Clonal sequences were compared with known 16S rRNA gene sequences in the Genbank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Ribosomal Database Project II (http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp) and identified with their most closely related relative.

Fermentative species in granular sludge were not previously studied using molecular techniques. Identification of the dominant fermentative species present in these glucose and sucrose fed anaerobic processes allows elucidation of the potential role of fermentative species in the breakdown of the carbohydrate-rich food waste. Identification of a consistent stable group of fermentative species should contribute to the development of such an anaerobic process in the utilisation of food waste and inevitably divert biodegradable carbohydrate-rich food waste away from the landfill sites.


**** PLEASE NOTE *** Queries reqarding this project should be directed to Martha Shaughnessy,
Administrative Officer,Research Office,Information Technology Building,
National University of Ireland, Galway,T: 353 (0)91 493124
Links To Other Related Resources
  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (Opens in a new window)
  http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp (Opens in a new window)

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