BOGLAND: Sustainable Management of Peatlands in Ireland (REPORT)

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Resource or Project Abstract

Peatlands are Ireland?s last great area of wilderness, hovering between land and water, providing unusual habitats for their unique and specialist flora and fauna. Peatlands cover a large part of the land surface in the Republic of Ireland, occurring as raised bogs, blanket bogs and fens, and forming cultural landscape icons in many parts of the country. The BOGLAND project was funded as part of the Sustainable Development Research Programme of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reveal the global significance of this national resource and the dilemmas of peatland management, utilisation and conservation. The management of the Irish peatland resource is a complex task comprising large areas of various habitats exhibiting a range of status (from near-intact to very degraded), involving a mixture of stakeholders and which are affected by many different (sometime contradicting) policies. In order to achieve sustainable management of peatlands, their ecosystem services (biodiversity, carbon storage and sink, archive value, etc.) should underpin policy. This is demonstrated in Section 4, where an economic analysis has revealed that peatlands are public goods that deliver benefits of great economic and social value (primarily in relation to carbon storage, biodiversity, amenity and landscape). However, these are often ignored by the general public and can sometimes work in conflicting directions. While there is a lack of public awareness regarding certain functions of peatlands (e.g. the contribution of peat extraction to increased carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere and related current climate change), people?s attitudes to peatlands are changing. The BOGLAND project focused on assimilating and synthesising the scientific information needed to inform policy about Irish peatlands. It revealed the global significance of this national resource and the dilemmas of peatland management, utilisation and conservation. The project yielded a lot of information on many aspects of peatlands covering the four pillars of sustainability: environmental, social, economic and institutional. Scientific chapters are available in full in the End of Project Report, while the main findings have been compiled in this report. Technical information about the services provided/affected by peatland use and management should now be readily presented to politicians and influential decision makers, with a clear impression of the consequence of alternative decisions and policies. Increasing the awareness (particularly to the wider public) of the current situation and possible future scenarios (backed up by enhanced scientific understanding) is critical to this evidence-based policy development. The protocol delivers an action plan or set of recommendations which should be used to draft a much-needed National Peatland Policy, which should ensure that this natural heritage is not lost in the future, but that it is safeguarded and enhanced during a challenging period of economic transition. In short, any vision of the future of Ireland must include the maintenance and enhancement of one of its last natural resources: peatlands. This protocol aims to succeed in achieving such a vision that serves the needs of the people and preserves our natural heritage.

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Contact Information for This Resource

Dr. Florence Renou-Wilson
University College Dublin
Environmental Research Scientist
Agriculture and Food Science Centre, Belfield, University College Dublin,, Belfield Dublin 4, Ireland
Telephone: +353 (0) 1 7167725
e-mail: florence.renou@ucd.ie

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Attachment Name and Download Link
Offline Print Quality Version    STRIVE_75_Renou_Bogland_prn.pdf  (4.03 Mb)
Project Report Optimised For Online Viewing    STRIVE_75_Renou_Bogland_prn_web.pdf  (2.35 Mb)
Att 3    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section4.pdf   (1.43 Mb)
Att 4    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section5.pdf   (0.28 Mb)
Att 5    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section6.pdf   (1.4 Mb)
Att 6    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Layout.pdf   (0.26 Mb)
Att 7    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section1.pdf   (0.38 Mb)
Att 8    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section2.pdf   (4.16 Mb)
Att 9    BOGLAND_EndOfProjectReport_Section3.pdf   (4.72 Mb)

Suggested Citation Information

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Author(s)Renou-Wilson, F.
Title Of WebsiteSecure Archive For Environmental Research Data
Publication InformationBOGLAND: Sustainable Management of Peatlands in Ireland (REPORT)
Name of OrganisationEnvironmental Protection Agency Ireland
Electronic Address or URL http://erc.epa.ie/safer/resource?id=a07e0103-46da-102f-8c70-b53a025bc1b8
Unique Identifiera07e0103-46da-102f-8c70-b53a025bc1b8
Date of AccessLast Updated on SAFER: 2017-06-29

An example of this citation in proper usage:

Renou-Wilson, F.   "BOGLAND: Sustainable Management of Peatlands in Ireland (REPORT)". Associated datasets and digitial information objects connected to this resource are available at: Secure Archive For Environmental Research Data (SAFER) managed by Environmental Protection Agency Ireland http://erc.epa.ie/safer/resource?id=a07e0103-46da-102f-8c70-b53a025bc1b8 (Last Accessed: 2017-06-29)

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Access Information For This Resource

SAFER-Data Display URL http://erc.epa.ie/safer/iso19115/display?isoID=236
Resource Keywordsbogs peat peatland sustainability ireland BOGLAND
EPA/ERTDI/STRIVE Project CodeSTRIVE 75
EPA/ERTDI/STRIVE Project ThemeBiodiversity
Resource Availability: Any User Can Download Files From This Resource
Public-Open
Limitations on the use of this ResourceAny attached datasets, data files, or information objects can be downloaded for further use in scientific applications under the condition that the source is properly quoted and cited in published papers, journals, websites, presentations, books, etc. Before downloading, users must agree to the "Conditions of Download and Access" from SAFER-Data. These appear before download. Users of the data should also communicate with the original authors/owners of this resource if they are uncertain about any aspect of the data or information provided before further usage.
Number of Attached Files (Publicly and Openly Available for Download): 9
Project Start Date Monday 1st January 2007 (01-01-2007)
Earliest Recorded Date within any attached datasets or digital objects Monday 1st January 2007 (01-01-2007)
Most Recent Recorded Date within any attached datasets or digital objects Saturday 1st October 2011 (01-10-2011)
Published on SAFERThursday 13th October 2011 (13-10-2011)
Date of Last EditTuesday 10th January 2012 at 15:36:20 (10-01-2012)
Datasets or Files Updated On Tuesday 10th January 2012 at 15:36:20 (10-01-2012)

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Geographical and Spatial Information Related To This Resource

Description of Geographical Characteristics of This Project or Dataset
BOGLAND looked at bog and peatlands all over the island of Ireland.

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Supplementary Information About This Resource

In this section some supplementary information about this resource is outlined. Lineage information helps us to understand why this project was carried out, what policy or research requirements did it fulfil, etc. Lineage is important in understanding the rationale behind the carrying out of a project or the collection of a specific dataset etc. Links to web sites, applications, papers, etc are outlined to provide you with additional information or supplementary reading about the project or dataset

Lineage information about this project or dataset
This large-scaled integrated study, informally known as the ?BOGLAND project? was funded as a 4-year ?sustainable development? project by the National Development Plan through the Environmental Research Technological Development and Innovation (ERTDI) research programme. Its overall objective was to develop guidance in the development of strategies for the sustainable future management of peatlands in Ireland. To this effect, this report aims to provide a synthesis of knowledge on this key natural resource, the important functions and roles that peatland ecosystems perform, their various utilisation, and how attitudes and policies affect them. This report presents recommendations on the development and the planning of peatland management that could be used as an information source in drafting laws and regulations and ultimately a peatland policy for Ireland. Finally, but not least, it is hoped that this report can communicate the reality of Irish peatlands to the public and Irish Government as well as academia in a clear and unambiguous fashion. his work built on the considerable body of existing information on vascular plant communities and macro- fauna (birds) of Irish peatlands. Vegetation can be used as a visible indicator of disturbance and is one of the simplest observable characteristics to assess the condition and development of a peatland. Birds, on the other hand, are a conspicuous biodiversity indicator which will respond to management actions. Soil and aquatic invertebrates have also an important role to play in the functioning of peatlands and were studied in detail in this project as little work had been carried out so far. Biodiversity is not limited to the ?visible? diversity present on the bog surface and the significance of the micro-organisms found in Irish peatland biodiversity was also assessed and quantified.
Supplementary Information
Complete Bogland Research Team:


Prof. Thomas Bolger, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Noel Boylan, School of Architecture, Landscape & Civil Engineering, University College Dublin
Dr Craig Bullock, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin
Dr Nicholas Clipson, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Marcus Collier, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin
Dr John Connolly, School of Agriculture, Food Science & Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin
Prof. Frank Convery, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin
Prof. Con Cunnane, Applied Ecology Unit, National University Ireland Galway
Dr Louise Deering, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Catherine Farrell, Bord na Móna
Prof. Ted Farrell, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr John Feehan, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Mike Gormally, Applied Ecology Unit, National University Ireland Galway
Dr Edel Hannigan, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Nick Holden, School of Agriculture, Food Science & Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin
Dr Paul Johnston, Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin
Dr Mary Kelly-Quinn, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Mike Long, School of Architecture, Landscape & Civil Engineering, University College Dublin
Mr Gerard Lynch, Teagasc, Athenry. Co. Galway and Johnstown Castle, Co. Wexford
Mr Paolo Mengoni, Teagasc, Athenry. Co. Galway and Johnstown Castle, Co. Wexford
Dr Richard Moles, Centre for Environmental Research, University of Limerick
Prof. Christoph Müller, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Ms Fionnula Murphy, School of Agriculture, Food Science & Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin
Mr Declan Peelo, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Mr Shane Regan, Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin
Dr Florence Renou-Wilson, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Rogier Schulte, Teagasc, Athenry. Co. Galway and Johnstown Castle, Co. Wexford
Dr. Mark Scott, School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin
Mr. Michael Walsh, Teagasc, Athenry. Co. Galway and Johnstown Castle, Co. Wexford
Prof. Shane Ward, School of Agriculture, Food Science & Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin
Dr Briony Williams, Teagasc, Athenry. Co. Galway and Johnstown Castle, Co. Wexford
Dr David Wilson, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Dr Rachel Wisdom, School of Biology and Environmental Resource, University College Dublin
Links To Other Related Resources
  http://www.ucd.ie/bogland/ (Opens in a new window)

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